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Using Highly Visible Line To Catch More Fish Gary Howey

  As we grow older, we find that some of our senses are not quite as acute as they were in our younger years and being successful in the outdoors may become a little tougher.

 It could be your hearing or perhaps your vision. Several things are available that will help to improve these things, such as hearing devices like the Walker Game Ear products and a set of prescription glasses to help to improve your sight.

  Even with prescription glasses, if you are an angler, you may have done your best to make your line invisible to the fish, by using a clear or green line, which at times is almost invisible to you.

  Over the last several years, I have found that by switching to a more visible type line allowed me to detect more bites and catch more fish.

  One reason for this is that with some of the clear lines, you may not detect the bite where the fish does not grab the bait and run with it but comes in at the same level sucks the bait it.  When this happens, your line coming out of the water will move, ever so slightly to the side, indicating a bite.

  If you are not a line watcher, one who continually watches your line or have a highly visible line, you are going to miss many of these subtle bites.

  That is why I fish with a highly visible line, I know what you are thinking, can’t the fish see that type of line better? Yes, they can, but in the turbid, dirtier water we fish down here at the tail end of the South Dakota Missouri River impoundments, you are not able to see your lure or your line once it gets past ten inches to a foot.  Moreover, when the line gets down to the fish, the line color may be invisible and not a big deal.  If I believe the deeper water is clearer, I will tip my line with a six to eight foot of a Fluorocarbon leader.

  When I will be heading to a lake or river where I know I will be fishing clearer water, I will grab my reels; I have loaded up with line for fishing those kinds of conditions. All of these rigs spooled up with the lightest line I believe I can get away with, all of the reels filled with some sort of highly visible lines such as Berkley’s XL or XT.  Their different Hi-Vis colors like the  Fluorescent Blue, Blaze Orange, Solar, Sensation or Trans Optic which is clear under water, yet turns gold in the sunlight  or  Fireline in Flame Green

  I have found that if I use some of these highly visible lines, that I can see every movement, even a slight tick when a fish bumps my bait, it helps me to detect even those subtlest of bites. [Read more…]

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The 15th Annual Paralyzed Veteran’s of America &Fireman’s Fishing event By Gary Howey

  What does it take to have the ability to take dozens of paralyzed veterans and other individuals fishing on the Missouri River? It’s a monumental task, which is pulled off each year in the Missouri River waters adjacent to Chamberlain/Oacoma, S.D.

  Our destination, Arrowwood, Cedar Shore Resort, which located on the west bank of the Missouri River near Oacoma and as  we pulled into the parking lot, there were vehicles from several states including; Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota, Colorado, North Dakota and Texas.

   The resort was the headquarters for the 2017 Firefighters Paralyzed Veterans of America North Central Chapter Joel Niemeyer Memorial Walleye Fishing event that was held May 25 and May 26.

  This event, the 15th annual would give disabled veterans and other individuals the opportunity to get out in a boat to do some fishing, for some; this would be their only opportunity of the year.

  Sponsored by numerous Fire fighters organizations, the North Central Chapter of the Paralyzed Veterans of America, local sponsors, several veterans groups, numerous volunteers, that included up to thirty boat commanders and first mates,  who’d volunteer their time, boats and equipment to take these folks out onto the river to fish. [Read more…]

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Red River Channel cats on the bite By Larry Myhre

Reprinted from the Sioux City Journal.

GRAND FORKS, N.D. | It was the Mother of All Cold Fronts that swept through Grand Forks, N.D., and other parts north a couple of weeks ago.

“The river is up about 13 feet from where it was a week ago,” Brad Durick told me over his cell phone. He was on the Red River with noted outdoor photographer Bill Lindner and staff, doing product still and video filming.

Gary Howey and I were pounding down the interstate on our way to Grand Forks after flying out of Ontario’s Carroll Lake. We were to fish with Brad the next day.

We had battled the effects of that cold front for the past week, all the way from Lake of the Woods to the Ontario fly-in. For the next few days the sun would be shining and we hoped the catfish, for which the Red River is noted, would be in a biting mood the next day.

As it turned out, they were.

The tip of Brad’s Rippin Lips catfish rod took a heavy dive and stayed down while the Rippin Lips 8/0 circle hook did its work. I picked up the rod and began battle with the channel cat.

It was a 10-pounder and like all his brothers, he fought to the end before we finally got him in the net.

“That cold front dropped the water temperature several degrees,” Brad said, “and that slowed the fishing. It was really great before.”

But the fishing was bouncing back and the next rod dipped with the bite of a 4-pounder.

Durick is widely known throughout the cat-fishing world. He is now a full-time cat-fishing guide on the Red and also can arrange trips on North Dakota’s Devils Lake. He is also a nationally recognized fishing educator and outdoor writer. He is the author of the 2013 self-published book, “Cracking the Channel Catfish Code.”

Prior to the cold front, the Red was running very low. The area had received little snow so there was no runoff, kind of unusual for this area.

In fact, in 2011 the river was at near flood stage the entire year. Now, with the river running 13 feet higher than earlier this year, Brad says the level is just right for good cat fishing.

“We just need it to warm up a bit,” Durick, a U.S. Coast Guard licensed captain, said.

We had launched Brad’s 19-foot G3 aluminum boat at the Grand Forks boat ramp and headed downstream, which is north on this side of the divide. We hadn’t run very far before Brad pulled above a river hole just off the main current and dropped his Cat River anchor (made in rural Hinton, Iowa, by the way) over the side.

With all three of us licensed to fish, we could put out two rods each. Each rod was rigged with 30-pound test mono on Abu Garcia Ambassadeur reels. A no roll, 2-ounce sinker rode above a swivel and a 2-foot leader of mono ran to the hook. The rigs were baited with cut sucker pieces. [Read more…]

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A versatile angler can catch fish anywhere By Larry Myhre

Reprinted from the Sioux City Journal.

Versatility is the key to successful fishing.

How many times have we heard that? Yet, do we really understand what that means.

Let’s envision a “dyed in the wool” walleye fisherman. At the end of his tunnel vision is that silvery fish with the big eyes.

He’s out on a good multi-species lake and trolling crank baits across the flats looking for his favorite fish. Problem is, crank baits aren’t producing. So, he begins drifting with jigs. Nothing there, either. It’s gotta be a live bait thing, he thinks, so out comes the bottom-bouncer rods, and he begins trolling spinners and crawlers along the weed line.

Where are those walleyes?

Bottom-bouncer rods go back in the box and out comes the slip bobber rods. He anchors on a reef, baits up with leeches and begins watching bobbers.

It’s been a long day. He has three 14-inch walleyes in the live well. He loads his boat and goes home thinking, “Boy, good thing I am a versatile fisherman.”

Problem is, he ain’t. [Read more…]