"Put the Power of Television advertising to work for you"

post

Lake of the Woods Fishing: Vast, Beautiful and Productive By Gary Howey

  As we made our way out of Zippel Bay on the Resorts thirty-foot charter boat, the lighthouse marker appeared on the rock jetty with Lake of the Woods looming out before us.

  Nick Painovich captained the boat with Captain Mitch Cole who had 40-years as a charter captain on the lake.

  As the charter, one of five the resort has came out of the bay into the main lake; the vastness of the lake became obvious with the lakes stretching out before us.

  On the hour run to one area Nick had taken fish on a previous trip, we talked about the resort and all it offers. We were staying in one of the many log cabins on the resort, each with three bedrooms, two baths, television, fireplace and well-equipped kitchen. These as well as smaller cabins, their lounge, swimming pool, hot tub, shoreline equipment for the kids and rental boats makes Zippel Bay Resort the only lake on the south shoreline near Williams, MN. it’s an ideal place for a family outing, fishing trip or corporate retreat.

  Lake of the Woods is the sixth largest freshwater lake located-partially in the United States; it’s 70 miles long and wide with more than 14,552 islands and 65,000 miles of shoreline.

  Our destination would be twenty-two miles out, where, we were able to see the shoreline of Ontario, Manitoba and the Northwest Angle the only U.S. territory lying in of Canada.

  Nick and His wife Deanna have owned the Resort since the late 70’s, with major improvements coming to the resort each year, making it one of the premier resorts on the big lake.

  On our first stop we’d be drifting, using 3-hook spinners and Wingit Quick Change bottom bouncers tipped with a crawler.

  It didn’t take long to realize Nick had the right plan as we put several fish in the boat, including keeper walleyes and sauger for our supper that evening.  Team Member Larry Myhre would even add a big perch to the menu. [Read more…]

post

Walleyes biting well on Lake of the Woods By Larry Myhre

Reprinted from the Sioux City Journal

WILLIAMS, Minn. — Nick Painovich, owner of Zippel Bay Resort, guided the big, 30-foot charter boat around the corner and through the mouth of the bay. Lake of the Woods lay before us. Nothing but water could be seen along the northern reaches. The view of the south shoreline was tree-lined until it, too, faded into the dancing heat waves and melded into the lake’s surface.

To the east you could see a couple of faraway islands, two of the over 14,000 found on this giant inland sea.

Our destination was 23 miles to the north just outside “the Northwest Angle.” The Northwest Angle is the farthest north portion of the contiguous United States. Its existence is thanks to a mapmaker’s error in the late 1700s.

It was an hour’s run to a reef where one of Nick’s charters had picked up some nice walleyes the day before.

Our plan was to troll bottom bouncers and spinners with nightcrawlers impaled on three-hook rigs. And, it was a good one.

We soon were pulling eating-size walleyes and saugers over the side of the big boat. The best ones were put in the live well for supper back at camp that night.

Gary Howey, of Hartington, Nebraska, and I had arrived at Zippel Bay the day before. Nick put us up in one of their big log homes available for guests. There are three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a jacuzzi, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, fireplace, flat-screen TV and a large deck.

We met Nick for breakfast in the lodge and then boarded the charter, where we were joined by Mitch Cole, a veteran charter boat captain with 40 years of service on the water.

All walleyes between 19.5 and 28 inches must be released at Lake of the Woods. The walleye/sauger aggregate limit is six, but not more than four can be walleyes. From Dec. 1 through April 14, the limit is increased to eight, but only four can be walleyes.

We were catching a lot of fish, nice 18- to 19-inch “eaters,” but none topped the 19.5 mark. We were hoping to get a “picture” fish, which, of course, would be released. Last year I released an eight-pounder. So we made a change of location to another reef about five miles to the southwest. A charter captain there told Mitch via marine band radio that he was trolling plugs behind downriggers and was catching some nice fish.

We pulled in, put down our spinners and began boating fish. But once again the larger fish were eluding us. [Read more…]