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Howey and Myhre Inducted into Hall of Fame

           Two area Outdoor communicators will be inducted into the Freshwater Fishing Hall of Fame during a ceremony at the Sioux Falls 50th Annual Sportsmen’s Show.

          Gary Howey, Hartington, Neb., and Larry Myhre, Sioux City, Iowa, will be inducted at 3:30 p.m., March 11 on the Seminar Stage at the Sioux Falls Arena. Professional walleye angler and Fishing Hall of Famer Ted Takasaki will conduct the ceremony.

          Howey, originally from Watertown, S.D., and a Viet Nam veteran, has been an outdoor communicator since 1980 when he began production of The Northeast Nebraska Outdoorsmen newspaper. He sold the Outdoorsmen magazine in 1995 when he created the Outdoorsmen Adventures television series, which airs throughout the year in seven upper Midwestern states.

          He has written a syndicated Of the Outdoors column since 1980 for newspapers and magazines.

          In 1990, he developed Outdoorsmen Productions, an outdoor-related promotional company.      

          In 2009, he produced the first of his Outdoor Adventures radio shows which he co-hosts. The show airs six days a week in southeast South Dakota, northeast Nebraska and northwest Iowa.

          A former hunting and fishing guide, Howey has given fishing seminars in South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa.

          Over the years, Howey has won several local, states and national awards for his print, radio and television work. [Read more…]

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Learning from Past Experiences! By Gary Howey

  I remember while growing up in Watertown, SD, about all the things there were to do and how I wanted to try to do all of them!

  I also remember that several of these things weren’t what I really should have been doing.  My folks were always there to set me straight and would give me that old line, “you don’t need to do that, you could get hurt” and so on and so forth!

  Well after many years of contemplating their statements and many years of wondering how they knew so much about this subject.  I’ve finally concluded that they knew because when they were young, they probably tried it or had a friend that tried it and “got hurt!”

  We all learn from past-experiences and as an outdoorsmen or women, we really should rely on those past-experiences to give us insight on what’s going on around us in the outdoors.

  Take for instance a guide trip that I had a few years back, I had two of the toughest clients that I can ever remember taking out.

  It was late October, a warm October, but none the less October and in my neck of the woods; it’s that time of the year when water is about as close to becoming ice as it gets.

  Well these guys insisted that I take them out as they wanted to take advantage of the warm day, it didn’t make any difference that the water temps were in the 40’s, it was a nice day and they wanted to fish.

  Well as anyone who’s ever been on the water knows that at 40 degrees, fish aren’t exactly bouncing off the wall, heck, they’re hardly moving. [Read more…]

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Late Season Pheasant Hunt Watertown, S.D. Gary Howey

  Anyone who has had the opportunity to hunt late season pheasants in South Dakota can relate to what this column is all about.

  Late season, after the weather turns cold means is when pheasant’s bunch up, sometimes into “huge” flocks.

  It is also that time when every step you take on the frozen ground or in the snow that every critter within hearing distance is going to go on the alert.  This is the time of the season when the first bird takes wing that every critter in the slough will now know something’s is not right!

  As our group of walkers started into the snow covered slough, the first of hundreds of pheasants erupted from the small group of cedars about 250 yards ahead of our wingmen while other birds hunkered down in the heavy slough, hoping our walkers would not find them.

  Team Outdoorsmen Adventures member Larry Myhre and I were in the Watertown area taking part in a late season pheasant hunt with Chuck Stone, a friend that graduated with me from Watertown high School. Several other of our WHS classmates were also on the hunt; they included Dennis Murphy and Joe Jipp from Watertown and Tom Sokoll from Omaha.

  Larry and I had been part of this event in years past and were never disappointed.  Over the years, the Stone’s, have developed several areas for pheasant hunting. Each of these has everything wildlife needed to make it through the tough South Dakota winters. The area has plenty of winter cover, several food plots as well as shelterbelts, all of which gave pheasants, deer and other wildlife a place to winter.

  On this trip, I would enter the slough not equipped with my 12-gauge shotgun but handling the filming with a Sony Hi-Def camera with Larry serving as one of the blockers at the end of the first slough.

  It did not take me long to realize how many pheasants were using the covered with cattail covered slough as there were fresh pheasant tracks in the snow going in every direction.

  The Stones knew the area well, setting up the hunt giving the hunters the best opportunity to get a shot at a pheasant.  Many of the hunters in the group had good hunting dogs that worked in between the walkers, with wingmen working on either side out in front of our walkers and blockers strategically placed on the end where we hoped to push the birds.

  Before us was a heavy cattail slough, a ridge off to our right with a cluster of Cedar trees at its northern end, off to our right was an open ridge leading into an unpicked cornfield (food plot) with all three converging into a short grass field where there were several round hay bales were out blockers would be posting.

  As we entered the slough, it looked as if we could walk on top of the hard heavy snow bank, and then drop down working our way in and around the cattails, but a few steps in the snow turned soft with the walkers and me breaking through into snow up to our knees.

  We were all having the same problem, except for the dogs as they could stay on top of the snow, following the numerous deer trails, which ran through the slough and working through the cattails trying to root out the birds that were holding tight. [Read more…]

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Wind, cold, snow part of late season recipe By Larry Myhre

Reprinted from the Sioux City Journal

WATERTOWN, S.D. — Late season pheasant hunts can be brutal. And this was one of them.

Temperature was in the teens. Wind was howling out of the northwest at 20 to 30 miles an hour.

I hunkered down in the snow, letting the big, round bale block most of the wind. Over a half mile away a long, thin line of hunters, all friends and veterans of many such hunts, were slugging it out in snow that had crusted on the top, but not enough to support their weight.

Occasionally I could hear a shot, small retorts carried away by the wind.

Then I saw deer busting across a small open field and disappear into the trees. From this distance they looked like long-legged ants scurrying away. I would later learn that the hunters estimated that over a hundred deer were spooked out of the timber.

I wasn’t surprised. We had driven along a field a couple miles to the west and the number of deer trails was unbelievable.

Gary Howey, Hartington, Neb., and I were here as guests of Chuck and his younger brother Rick Stone, both of Watertown. We were hunting private land in the vicinity of a private hunting lodge the Stones own that served as our headquarters. [Read more…]

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Remembering Terry Redlin By Gary Howey

  As I approached Watertown on I-29 on the April 29, the flags in front of the Redlin Art Center were flying at half-staff.  These flags as well as all the flags throughout the state were at half-staff at the request of South Dakota State Governor Dennis Daugard to honor the life of iconic South Dakota artist Terry Redlin who passed away Sunday April 24. 

  Those of us who are members of wildlife conservation groups love the outdoors, and appreciate beautiful artwork lost a great friend.

  Wildlife and Americana artist, Terry Redlin of Watertown, South Dakota passed away

Sunday April 24 at 78 after his long battle with dementia.

  I was very fortunate to know Terry, as he and my stepfather Francis Kick from Watertown were good friends.  Over the years, I spent time with Terry in his home and at the Art Center when we filmed several of our Outdoorsmen Adventures shows with him.

  Terry was a quiet man who put what he saw in the outdoors on canvas as no other could. If you saw one of his paintings, it jumped out at you, grabbing your attention!  His paintings were scenes in the outdoors, which many outdoorsmen and women had experienced or someday would hope to see.

  The light coming from the windows of the cabins, homes, the sunrises and sunsets on his paintings was his trademark. His were the heart-warming scenes captured on canvas.

  Because I was born and raised in Watertown, when I viewed his artwork, it brought me home. Many of his paintings were scenes from my childhood, things I saw and experienced. [Read more…]

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Watertown Mourns the Loss of Native Son and Artist Terry Redlin

Terry Redlin, one of the country’s most widely collected painters of wildlife and Americana, died Sunday after a nine year struggle with dementia. He was 78 years old.

The only child of Alfred Redlin and Dora (Stein) Redlin, Terry Avon Redlin was born just north of Watertown, South Dakota on July 11, 1937. At the age of 15, Terry lost a leg in a motorcycle accident. It was at that time that the State of South Dakota offered him a scholarship through a program for students with disabilities. Terry graduated from Watertown High School in 1955. He married Helene (Langenfeld) Redlin in 1956.  The couple moved to St. Paul, Minnesota where Terry used his scholarship to attend the St. Paul School of Associated Arts. Upon graduation in 1958, Terry was hired by Brown & Bigelow in Minnesota as a playing card designer. His career as a commercial artist and illustrator culminated in the position of art director for Webb Publishing Company, also in Minnesota. It was there that Terry decided to venture into the world of wildlife art. In 1977, Terry published his first open edition print, “Apple River Mallards.”  In 1979, he left his position with Webb Publishing to concentrate on painting wildlife.

His 30 year career as a wildlife and Americana artist included many artistic accomplishments and accolades. In 1990, he was voted “America’s Most Popular Artist” in a nationwide poll of art dealers. He held that title for nine consecutive years. In 1992, he began releasing the first of eight images in his “America the Beautiful” series.  In 2004 he released seven paintings entitled “An American Portrait,” a tribute to veterans and their families. Based on the death of his brother-in-law, Charles Langenfeld, who was killed in action in Vietnam, the series was nine years in the making. [Read more…]

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If you’re thinking Pheasants You have to be thinking South Dakota! By Gary Howey

If you are an upland game bird hunter, you have probably heard the stories about the great pheasant hunting in South Dakota.

As I travel throughout the U.S. and talk with people about hunting and the outdoors, the first question they ask when hearing that I am originally from South Dakota is, “I hear the pheasant hunting is pretty good up there?”

Any ways, that would be their lead in to the conversation because they already know darn good and well that the pheasant hunting in South Dakota is phenomenal!

They had either been there, read about it or wished they could be there during the next pheasant-hunting season!

When I lived in South Dakota, Watertown to be exact, we just took it for granted that everyone had pheasants as we did.

It was nothing to walk from my home in southwest Watertown and see pheasants everywhere. They were part of the landscape like the cattle and other animals we saw around the farms and you did not have to go very far before you saw the next bunch of pheasants.

With each trip to South Dakota I am reminded what pheasant hunting was really like. [Read more…]

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The Artwork of Terry Redlin A Step Back in Time by Gary Howey

Terry Redlin’s artwork and the Redlin Art Center are amazing! They attract collectors and visitors from throughout the world. There has been no one with the talent to capture the outdoors on canvas as Terry Redlin has done.

I was very fortunate to have filmed two of our Outdoorsmen Adventures television shows with Redlin and spent numerous hours going through his Redlin Art Center in Watertown, S.D.

Each time I make my way through the Art Center, I am amazed at the how beautiful it is and Terry’s paintings hold me in awe.

For those of you that haven’t heard of Terry Redlin, he’s a Master Artist, one of the country’s most popular and widely collected wildlife and Americana artists. For eight years in a row 1991-1998 Redlin, voted, America’s Most Popular Artist by U.S. Art magazine and in 1992 inducted into the U.S. Arts Hall of Fame.
Terry stormed onto the wildlife artist scene with his 1977 release of “Winter Snows.” Terry Redlin enthusiasts have collected 2 million art prints and an even greater number of collectibles and home décor products were sold — all inspired by his unique artistic talent.

This beautiful structure, the Art Center, designed by Terry’s son Charles Redlin is the home of Terry Redlin’s collection of original paintings. It opened its doors in June 1997 and is located on the east side of Watertown just off I- 29 (Exit 177) on U.S. Highway 212.

The structure is a 52,000 square foot brick building with white granite columns reaching 38 feet skyward. The design was inspired by the Egyptian Revival period and its huge granite columns resemble those you would see on some of the large southern mansions. [Read more…]