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The Redlin Art Center To Unveil the Painting, “Sunrise”, the first of three special paintings in “The Farewell Collection”

Renowned wildlife and American artist Terry Redlin left a tremendous legacy of beautiful art for generations to enjoy. On Monday, April 24, the anniversary of Terry Redlin’s passing, the Redlin Art Center will add the original oil painting, “Sunrise”, to the gallery.  It is the first of three special paintings Redlin was working on before he passed away.

This collection of paintings, now referred to as “The Farewell Collection”, gives us a rare glimpse of Terry Redlin’s work while in process. These three paintings were near completion when illness resulted in the artist’s decision to retire. Because of the desire from his collectors to see, enjoy and collect everything Terry Redlin created, we are pleased to offer this unique opportunity to experience a piece of art the artist was still working on. The Farewell Collection consists of three paintings, “Sunrise”, “Sunset”, and “After the Storm”, and will be released over the next three years. The original oil painting, “Sunrise”, will be on temporary display within the Redlin Art Center beginning April 24th as a tribute to an artist – and a man – admired and loved by so many.

In  this painting, Redlin returned to the style he referred to as “romantic realism”. His focus was the landscape as seen from “a bird’s eye view”. Although not finished with the fine brush strokes and intricate detail he was known for, this beautiful painting invites us to imagine what the artist may have added to the painting next; and to reflect upon the man who became known as the “master of memories”. When asked about his art, Terry always said,


“I’m a small town boy. Always was. Always will be. All I ever wanted to do was hunt and fish and wander the woods. Nature was my favorite teacher. The beautiful outdoors and the many memories of my childhood fascinated me. I remember the stories told around the kitchen table and the evening campfires. I dream about those long ago times and attempt to re-create them as truly as memory and imagination will allow. How fortunate I’ve been to spend my life creating memories of these distant times for others to enjoy. I only hope that my art is worthy of the subject.”


Through his art, Terry dreamt of long ago times. He re-lived experiences. He reminisced about people he knew.  Now, it is your turn. Imagine what this serene scene might include and what memories it holds for you. We invite you to lose yourself in the art of Terry Redlin and this special piece, one of Terry’s last gifts to collectors. 

Admission to the Redlin Art Center is free

https://redlinart.com/events/redlin-art-center-unveils-original-oil-painting-sunrise

 

 

 

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Shallow water walleyes love crank baits By Larry Myhre

Reprinted from the Sioux City Journal.
WEBSTER, S.D. | I don’t think there is a more fun way to catch walleyes than by casting crankbaits on spinning tackle.
And the best time to do that is right now. The big female walleyes have recovered from the rigors of spawning and are back in the shallows, feeding up big. Find a windy shoreline on the right lake, and you’ll have action to dream about.  The Webster area is full of lakes and sloughs that fit the description of the “right” lake.
Last week, Gary Howey, of Hartington, Neb., and I met with Cory Ewing, of Waubay Lake Guide Service, to film a segment for Howey’s “Outdoorsmen Adventures” television show and to get fodder for our newspaper columns.
We’ve fished with Ewing a number of times over the years, and that guy is so tuned into the fishing here that every trip has been an exciting fish catching experience. This trip was no different.
Although the lake that gets the most attention right now is Bitter Lake, an overgrown former slough that is currently South Dakota’s biggest natural lake, we chose to fish a 200-acre nameless slough with no boat ramp. Ewing met us at Perebooms Cafe in Webster with his 16-foot boat in tow. I knew then we were heading for the boondocks.
As we motored out of town, Ewing told us, “We need that wind to blow. That will bring those big fish into the shoreline.”
We dropped the boat trailer over a 3-foot drop to reach the water and before long we were casting the shoreline.
“There’s some really nice walleyes in here,” Ewing said. “And there are lots of northerns and some perch.” [Read more…]