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Establishing Spring Food Plots

With spring in full swing and the woods coming to life after a long winter hiatus, the opportunities for improving habitat for wildlife are numerous. If you live in the south, the soil temperature is ripe for planting, and the Midwest and north are not far behind. If you have had problems in the past establishing spring and summer plots for your deer because of over browsing and high deer numbers, trying to time your planting to coincide with spring green up can be a big advantage. Whitetails love the fresh growth that the woods and thickets explode with during that first few weeks of green up. There is no other time of year when there is such an overwhelming amount of fresh browse

from such a variety of plants. This explosion of vast amounts of new food throughout the woods can take a lot of pressure off of your plots and give them a chance to get some established growth that is more tolerant of browse pressure. It can be hard to realize that you can plant warm season plots like BioLogic’s LabLab or BioMass All Legume this early in the year, but once the threat of frost is gone and soil temperatures warm up to the upper 50’s, it is game on. Also remember to try BioLogic’s Plot Protector kit, this is what I rely on to make sure our plots get established and feed our deer for the entire summer.

 

 

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When the fish won’t bite! Try something different! By Gary Howey

  What I’m about to write about happened to me numerous times over the years and I’m sure it will happen again.

   We were fishing on one of the numerous lakes near Watertown, South Dakota and not having much luck. I was beginning to think there wasn’t a walleye in the lake and as I was about to call it a day, I finally located some fish with my locator.

   My eyes were glued to my locator, as they had most of the day, hoping to find some active fish.

  As I was working my way back and forth over this one particular spot, there they were fish just off the bottom in 12 foot of water, as well as several on the bottom. They were showing up as those big lazy arcs indicating the presence of fish and by the size of the marks on the locator, they appeared to be big!

  Since they were located right on or just a couple of feet or so off the bottom, I guessed they were active walleyes and immediately marked the spot.

  Grabbing a couple rods one rigged with a live bait rigs while on the other I used a jig. I put the one rod with the live bait rig in a rod holder letting it drag along the edge the drop off, while I used a jig, working it up from the deeper water onto the flat where my locator indicated the fish were holding.

  Even though the fish appeared to be active as they were off the bottom, it didn’t take me long to realize that these fish were in a negative mood or weren’t interested in what I was offering.

  I started digging through my tackle bag, switching from one walleye bait to another, going with my old standards, a bottom bouncer with a spinner baited with a minnow. I tried a livebait rig with a crawler, a jig with a Gulp leech, bottom bouncer and spinner and finally going to a crawler on a plain hook with just a small split shot for weight, all to no avail.

  These fish weren’t in the mood, no matter what I was putting in front of them; they just ignored my offerings or lay tight on the bottom refusing to move.

  Once again, I started rummaging through my tackle bag, looking for something different that the walleyes may not have seen before, something to get them to bite. I needed something, that might get the fish’s attention, and to pull them out of their negative mood.

  That’s when I decided to try something different. To do the change up and try a bait I’d used on negative fish in past years. The rig had worked on previous fishing trips on the Missouri River and on lakes in Minnesota to get lethargic walleyes attention and to get them to bite.

  It’s not anything fancy; it’s just something different that most walleye may not have seen before!

When things get slow, and you’ve used every walleye bait in your tackle bag, try something different, Do The Change-Up

  I pulled a floating jig head from my tackle bag and started rigging it in a way that I hoped would work to get them to bite.

  I attached the floating jig head to about a foot of monofilament, tying it about 2′ up the line and at the end of my line, in place of the weight, I attached a ¼ ounce jig.

  Depending on the depth I’m fishing and the amount of current I’m facing, I’ll go with a ¼ oz. jig or a 3/8 oz. jig if I’m fishing in deeper water or in heavier current.

   The style of jig I like to use on this rig is a stand up jig as it “stands up” holding my bait up off the bottom, putting it right in the face of the bottom hugging fish.

  Once the rig ready to go, I baited the floating jig head with a Gulp leech, which would float about, 2′ off the bottom working its way right through the suspended walleyes with the standup jig baited with a minnow running right on the bottom.

  This rig works in several ways, as I jigged along the bottom; it created a cloud of dirt that should attract the fish to my bait.  The floating jig head located above the jig at the depth where I had seen the suspended fish on my locator enticed those fish to bite.

  On this trip, after switching rigs, I managed to take some excellent fish, several in the seventeen to nineteen inch range as well as some smaller fish.

There are days on the water when old walleye standbys may not work, you don’t want to get stuck in the routine where you use the same old traditional bates, not catch fish and go home skunked.

There are times when those baits may not catch fish and you have to come up with a new plan.

When all else fails, you may have to give the fish something different, to do the “Change Up” in order to entice them to look at your bait.

 

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Redlin Art Center To Celebrate 20th Anniversary with Arrival of Four More Originals

On Tuesday, June 6th, in celebration of its 20th anniversary, the Redlin Art Center will add four more original oil paintings to the gallery.  These original oil paintings were sold by Terry Redlin to a private collector in the early 1980’s. To Terry, selling his original art was just part of being an artist. That changed in 1985 when Terry’s son, Charles, convinced his father to stop selling original paintings. It was Charles’ dream to build the Redlin Art Center, fill it with his father’s originals and open it for all to enjoy. On June 6, 1997, Charles’ dream came true with the grand opening of the Redlin Art Center in Terry’s hometown of Watertown, South Dakota. 

The Redlin Art Center -Watertown, S.D.

Now, twenty years later, the Redlin Art Center is pleased to announce that Terry Redlin’s “Glow” series will be added to the gallery. The Redlin family has never searched for the original paintings that were sold by Terry prior to 1985. The owner of these four paintings reached out to the Redlin Art Center a few years ago. It was his desire to see the paintings return to the Redlin Art Center, but he was not in a position to make a donation; and the Center was not in a position to purchase them. Recently, the Redlin Art Center was contacted by an anonymous donor who wanted the paintings returned to the gallery. This cash gift enabled the Redlin Art Center to purchase the paintings.

Considered by some to be among the best in Terry Redlin’s collection, the “Glow” series includes “Morning Glow”, “Afternoon Glow”, “Twilight Glow” and “Evening Glow”. The paintings are exquisite examples of the “romantic realism” Terry referenced as his style. Wildlife, calm water, and glowing campfires captured at different times of day with shadows and light creating the mood. All four were painted with the intricacies and finesse art enthusiasts have admired throughout Terry Redlin’s career. 

Join the Redlin family and the Redlin Art Center staff for an open house from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, June 6th and celebrate the arrival of these magnificent originals. An anniversary performance by the Watertown City Band will follow at 8:15 p.m. on the art center’s grounds. Bring your lawn chair! Admission is free.

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Protect yourself from Tick Borne diseases By Gary Howey

  Most seasons, deer, turkey pheasant can be found listed on the Game, Fish and Parks calendars and web sites, one you won’t find there is the tick season, but don’t let that stop you from being prepared for this season in the same way you’d be prepared for the others.

  Ticks are small disease carrying insects found in grassy and wooded areas and if allowed to get on the skins look for a warm moist area to embed themselves. They come out in the spring, about the time outdoorsmen and women head into the woods looking for morel mushrooms, wild asparagus or hunting turkeys. Spring isn’t the only time you’ll see ticks as these pests hang around all summer on into the fall.

  There are two groups of ticks, the hard and hard or soft ticks. In our area, it’s the hard ticks found in wooded, grassy, and densely vegetated areas.

  Soft ticks tend to live in bird nests, on rodents, and on bats but either can find their way onto us, luckily, no species of ticks solely depend on us for survival. Some ticks are only found on a certain host; luckily, we aren’t one of them.

  A female tick can lay a bunch of eggs, anywhere from 3,000 to 11,000 eggs, so we need to be aware of them and prevent them from catching a ride on us.

  There’s only one way to avoid the possibility of avoiding a tick borne disease and that’s to avoid areas they inhabit, DUH, like that’s going to happen, if you’re an outdoorsmen or women who spends every spare moment out in the field or woods.

  Since we know we are going to be in the same areas that ticks inhabit, below are a few simple precautions that can reduce the chances of a tick encounter.

Tip #1: Ticks crawl upward onto a host, that’s why it’s a good idea to cut off any route they might have in an attempt to get on your skin and why it’s an excellent idea to tuck your pants legs into your boots and your shirts into your pants. For extra protection, tape them shut with duct tape, then twist the tape so the sticky side is out and make one more wrap. [Read more…]

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Spring Walleye Fishing By Gary Howey

     Well it’s finally starting to look and feel like spring and to be honest with you, I’m ready for the warmer weather!

  Each day gets a little longer, the sun is warmer and everything is starting to green up.

  It’s what we outdoorsmen and women have been waiting for, as they’re anxious to hit the water and see what’s biting this time of the year.

  With the water temperatures, starting to raise the walleyes below the dams on the river and in the lakes will start feeding more heavily.

  Spawning in some areas is ending as the water temperatures have or will soon reach 50, which in the upper Midwest is generally in the month of May.

  If you’ve fished the post spawn, you know that the smaller more aggressive males make up the majority of the fish taken during this time of the year.

  After the spawning and recuperation period, walleyes will go on a feeding binge because eating during the spawn wasn’t real high on their “To Do.”

  This feeding binge can last throughout the month and at times may even run into early June.

  On sunny days the best fishing, will be in the morning or towards evening, because in the middle of the day the sun is beating down on the shallows which forces walleye and sauger to move deeper as they’re not big fans of a lot of light.

  If you’re fishing on cloudy day or times when the sunlight is subdued, chances are the walleye and sauger may spend the better part of the day cruising in and out of the shallows looking for a meal.

  It’s during those low-light periods when walleyes are on the prowl in the shallower water, usually 10 foot or less.

  Remember just because the walleyes are on a feeding binge it doesn’t mean they’ll be dashing and darting here and there attacking everything in sight.

  Walleyes like all fish are cold blooded and their metabolism is in direct relation to the water temperature, so they won’t be in high gear, as the water temperature isn’t warm enough.  [Read more…]

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2017 PDR Deer Hunt

 
In mid September for the past nine years the PDR group, an independent, non-profit organization, has hosted an all expenses paid Whitetail deer hunt exclusively for physically disabled adolescents..  The hunt is held in Clark, South Dakota but the hunters have come from all over the Midwest.  There have been some wonderful life time memories made at the annual PDR Hunt.  But, your help this year is requested to provide more treasured memories for qualified candidates and their parent or guardian. 
 
If you would post the invitation on your website or events calendars it would be appreciated.  A follow up from the 2017 Hunt with photographs will be provided to your media outlet, for any local tie-ins that occur.  Direct any questions you have to PDR Hunt founder, Dean Rasmussen at 605-233-0331.   Your news department can also contact him regarding a story about the PDR Hunt.  
 
By the way, the letters P.D.R. are the initials of Dean’s late grandchild. who he was never able to hunt with.  Again, this is a free, guided deer hunt, on private ground, that land owners in Clark, SD conduct.  It is staffed 100% by volunteers and has been for nearly a decade.   Only a few of the dozen slots remain open for the 2017 Hunt and the information about this outdoor adventure needs to get to families of prospective hunters.

 

 

 

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STRUCTURE Makes the difference By Gary Howey

  You won’t have to look very far in most fishing publications or on a fishing show where you won’t hear the words structure mentioned several times.

  One thing is for sure, when you locate the structure on a farm pond, Lake Oahe or Lake Kampeska, you’re going to find the fish.

  Structure, exactly what is it?  A good definition of structure would be any difference or change on the bottom configuration.  At times, it might be large and at others, not large at all.

  No matter what size or type of structure you find on any body of water, it’s a good bet that there will be some aquatic life in that area.

 Now that we know the fish you are hoping to catch might be relating to some sort of structure in the lake, all you need to do is to locate the right piece of structure. This change in the bottom contour can attract numerous species of aquatic creatures, which creates a food chain.

  To make our body of water the underwater structure easier to understand let’s put it into above water terms. Let’s imagine a large pasture is your body of water with a large tree in the middle and a small clump of plum brush in the corner.

  Fish are like any other animal such as a deer or coyote and when they enter the pasture, the first thing they’re going to see is these two changes or features in the field and they’re drawn to them as these may be a good place to look for food.  If they’re underwater, these changes would be called structure.

  As I mentioned earlier, the change doesn’t need to be huge, as it can be a slight depression on the bottom or areas where the bottom content changes from soft mud to hard gravel.

   I’ve caught fish around some structure so small, unless I’d seen it when the water was low, I’d have never known it was there. 

  It could be a few weeds along the shoreline, a change from mud to gravel, a depth change in the old river channel, submerged trees, humps or points in the Missouri River reservoirs lakes. It doesn’t have to be a drastic change; it just needs to be something different.

WHY FISH RELATE TO STRUCTURE

  Studies have shown us how fish relate to structure and how much is needed in order for the fish to be attracted to one particular area.

  In studies, fish were put into a large stock tank and when the bottom configuration is all the same, the fish roamed around the tank. However, when rocks were placed on the bottom, the fish moved onto those rocks.  This example didn’t give the fish all they needed as most real structure does, but it gives you an idea as to how fish react to it.

  What draws these fish to these areas is simple; structure in a lake, reservoir or pond gives the fish everything they need; a food source, security and in some cases comfortable water temperatures. [Read more…]

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Spring Turkey Hunting When They Won’t Come In Gary Howey

  One of the things that I hear a lot when it comes to spring turkey hunting is the Toms will gobble every time the hunter calls,  but will not come in that last 35 yards or so into range.

  This is definitely a problem for turkey hunters and numerous reasons why a bird will not come in or hang up just out of range.

  In the real wild world, the hen hears the Tom gobble and comes to him.  Hunters need to reverse the roles in order to pull a Tom into range. 

 Can you imagine how hard this is on a big old Tom’s ego?  He is the big boy, the dominant Tom and he has proved it, kicking the daylights out of any other Tom that gets getting in his way. Here the gobbler is, strutting  his stuff, all fanned out and the hen just does not get it, she is suppose to come to him and will not play the game right.

  Well, if he is going to get the opportunity to get close to this hen, he will have to forget about his ego and work his way towards her, hoping that once she sees him she, in all his glory will come to her senses and come to him. Some Toms take a little longer to swallow their pride and may not move or saunter your way, which could take a long time.

  The most common reason a Tom will hang up is that he has hens with him.  It does not take a rocket scientist to figure out if an old Tom has several hens in his harem already; he is not going to leave two or three hens for a chance at a single hen.

  When a bird will not move and are henned up, do not give up. There are several things you might try to convince him to come your way.

  The first is to become vocal, call as if there are several different hens talking to him, by using a couple of different calls and changing the pitch.

  Many times, this will make the bird curious and draw the Tom towards you.  Do not give up or get upset if he takes his time coming your way, because he will have to bring his hens with him or take the chance of leaving them and having some subordinate Tom walk off with his harem.

  There are always subordinate Toms following in the shadows or with the flock.  The ones with the flock are generally the younger birds or birds that have not acted aggressively towards the dominate Tom.  Those hanging around the fringes of the flock are usually the older birds that the dominate birds has stomped the tar out of.  These are the birds that know better than to get to close, but are hanging around just in case something happens to the dominate bird or a hen strays from the fold.

  If the dominate bird hangs up and doesn’t come in, many times the loud boisterous calling will pull one of the subordinate Toms in and you’ll be able to tip one of them over and fill your tag.

  Another method that I have used to call a gobbler that has hens into range is to call to his girl friends.  There is usually a dominate hen with the group and if you talk sweet enough, long enough and loud enough, she might just come over and see who or what is trying to take her man away.

  I used this method numerous time; one that really emphasizes what I am talking about was a hunt years ago on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota to help Larry Myhre from The Sioux City Journal to fill his tag. 

  Most of the larger Toms had collected their harems and were not about to leave their flock to check out a lone hen.

  This Tom was over the hill, so I set up down the hill from Larry, putting my decoy in between us.

   I started calling with a slate call and immediately heard several responses from different gobblers.  I worked the birds for about 10 minutes and could not get them to come any closer, so I started to call louder and more frequently to the hen.  She got louder and started coming our way.  This went on for another 10 minutes, but the hen was getting closer, I knew if the hen left the Tom, he would have to follow her over the hill giving my partner the opportunity for a shot.

   As my slate got squeaky, I switched to my diaphragm call while I roughed up the surface of the slate call.  When my mouth got dry, I switched back to the slate and kept going back and fourth or used them together to make the Tom think there were several hens on this side of the hill.

  I kept it loud, because the Tom was not moving, he was hung up and I needed to bring the hen over in order to get the gobbler within range. 

  Fifteen minutes after I started calling, the hen appeared at the top of the hill and headed directly towards my decoy clucking, spitting and putting all the way.  She was “MAD”!

  Fortunately, for my decoy, another Tom had been responding to my calls and after twenty minutes of calling, she lost interest in my decoy and the Tom over the hill and headed off to looking for the other bird.

  When she shut up, I backed off on the calls and waited for the Tom and the rest of his harem to come looking for his hen that had wondered off.  It did not take long after the hen moved off when a blue and white head popped up over the rise.  A few more clucks and purrs and the gobbler stepped over the hill and into Larry’s sights and it was all over. [Read more…]

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The Redlin Art Center To Unveil the Painting, “Sunrise”, the first of three special paintings in “The Farewell Collection”

Renowned wildlife and American artist Terry Redlin left a tremendous legacy of beautiful art for generations to enjoy. On Monday, April 24, the anniversary of Terry Redlin’s passing, the Redlin Art Center will add the original oil painting, “Sunrise”, to the gallery.  It is the first of three special paintings Redlin was working on before he passed away.

This collection of paintings, now referred to as “The Farewell Collection”, gives us a rare glimpse of Terry Redlin’s work while in process. These three paintings were near completion when illness resulted in the artist’s decision to retire. Because of the desire from his collectors to see, enjoy and collect everything Terry Redlin created, we are pleased to offer this unique opportunity to experience a piece of art the artist was still working on. The Farewell Collection consists of three paintings, “Sunrise”, “Sunset”, and “After the Storm”, and will be released over the next three years. The original oil painting, “Sunrise”, will be on temporary display within the Redlin Art Center beginning April 24th as a tribute to an artist – and a man – admired and loved by so many.

In  this painting, Redlin returned to the style he referred to as “romantic realism”. His focus was the landscape as seen from “a bird’s eye view”. Although not finished with the fine brush strokes and intricate detail he was known for, this beautiful painting invites us to imagine what the artist may have added to the painting next; and to reflect upon the man who became known as the “master of memories”. When asked about his art, Terry always said,


“I’m a small town boy. Always was. Always will be. All I ever wanted to do was hunt and fish and wander the woods. Nature was my favorite teacher. The beautiful outdoors and the many memories of my childhood fascinated me. I remember the stories told around the kitchen table and the evening campfires. I dream about those long ago times and attempt to re-create them as truly as memory and imagination will allow. How fortunate I’ve been to spend my life creating memories of these distant times for others to enjoy. I only hope that my art is worthy of the subject.”


Through his art, Terry dreamt of long ago times. He re-lived experiences. He reminisced about people he knew.  Now, it is your turn. Imagine what this serene scene might include and what memories it holds for you. We invite you to lose yourself in the art of Terry Redlin and this special piece, one of Terry’s last gifts to collectors. 

Admission to the Redlin Art Center is free

https://redlinart.com/events/redlin-art-center-unveils-original-oil-painting-sunrise