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ICOtec Leads Wildlife Research Using Call Development with QUWF

 

 

Buffalo , MO: “All of the habitat work, Memorandums of Understanding and claimed acres of restoration mean nothing if the populations of wildlife, in our case upland game, are not positively influenced with healthy population growth” states Craig Alderman of QUWF. “The wildlife habitat work must be constant, and the fact that the majority of lands are with private ownership or the smaller portion of public lands means we must monitor what we call “body counts”, the actual numbers of wildlife observed, counted, surveyed and documented.

 
Otherwise we can waste immense dollars, untold man hours and supplies and have the same decreasing results we have witnessed for decades” Alderman explains.
 
“Working with QUWF, ICOtec added calls used for survey purposes of the bob white quail, ruffed grouse and even feral hogs with several more planned. Combined with their advanced electronic calling technologies, these advances provide a huge advantage in active field work. “Turnin-the-dirt” has to be graded with population success by all organizations, ICOtec gives habitat evaluation a new and exciting tool” concludes Alderman.
“The exciting use of our calls for wildlife population studies and evaluations is something ICOtec values above all else with QUWF. They approach wildlife habitat restoration from a holistic approach, making every penny, from every source count for wildlife” states Chuck Ames of ICOtec. “QUWF’s entire structure is unlike other conservation organizations, they work exceptionally hard to benefit all upland game, creatively think out of the box for hunters, landowners and public agencies and that is why we strongly support their efforts as a National Sponsor” Ames declares.

“New evaluation techniques have to be developed which make the process easier, faster and results documented professionally” states QUWF Chief Wildlife Biologist Nick Prough. “Evaluating habitat conditions means nothing if there is no wildlife there. Wasting dollars and manpower on wildlife habitat in the wrong place deters from a great mission. It has to be monitored all the time. ICOtec now gives us a great tool to use natural calls and provide visual confirmation of the work performed. They stepped up with QUWF and the entire industry is better for it” explains Prough.

As of January 2016, QUWF and its local chapters and members have impacted 3.2 million acres of wildlife habitat and its chapters spent over $152 Million Dollars in their local communities. That is “Turnin-the-Dirt™”.

Quail and Upland Wildlife Federation, Inc.™ is the only Disabled American Veteran Founded, tax exempt 501(c)(3) conservation organization in the U.S., serving its members and chapters nationwide. QUWF provides a strong local source of habitat focus on all upland wildlife with population recovery. Millions of dollars of habitat work have been completed by its members over the years on millions of acres of both private and public lands. That work continues with a renewed vitality. Our chapters from coast to coast, provide the grass roots, local habitat work that is making a difference each and every day. For more information or to join QUWF please visit our website at www.quwf.net.

Quail and Upland Wildlife Federation, Inc.

P.O. Box 947, Buffalo, MO 65622; admin@quwf.net

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The “Prime” Time for Predator Calling! By Gary Howey

  The weather has changed and its cold, too cold to do many outdoor activates, sure, ice fishing is coming soon, but it may be awhile before there’s enough ice to fish.

  One thing you can do if you bundle up warm is to call predators.  As the weather starts to change, become colder, furbearers, including coyotes and fox will have their heavy winter fur, which helps them make it through the winter.

  Then there are those poor coyotes that have developed the mange a terrible infliction where they lose all or most of their fur, with the most humane thing that could happen to them would be to put out of their misery.

  When it’s cold like it is, all critters and waterfowl will spend time moving and hunting, looking for some high protein food source to help keep their bodies warm. This means they’ll be out more as they have to eat often in order to make it through this tough time of the year.

   This is why, this time of the year is “prime” time to call predators, with several of the predators you may have come to your call be coyotes, fox and bobcats.

  Predator callers generally hunt with a small caliber rifle with lighter grain bullets, with 223-22-250 and 243 being three of the more popular calibers. Having s good variable scope mounted on tour rifle is also a good idea as it allows hunters to make some of the sometimes-difficult shots needed when hunting predators. 

  Getting permission to call predators is generally not too hard of a task as farmers and ranchers who’ve cattle have no love for predators. Predators are opportunists, taking advantage of anything that offering an easy meal and known to hang around calving yards.

All predator’s I mentioned above have excellent eyesight, hearing and an acute sense of smell, when calling predators you’ll want to glass the area you plan to call, then put together a plan, get in and set up quietly, which means using the terrain to your advantage. 

   Because the ground in the area is frozen or snow covered, you’ll want to come in slowly, making as little noise as possible and wearing some sort of camouflage to break up your outline is a big plus. Try to keep something, a cedar tree or some other vegetation between you and the area you’re calling when coming in to set up.

   The most important thing, as is with all hunting is to use the wind to your advantage by calling with the wind in your face so the keen nose of the predators don’t detect you.

  Even if the predators don’t spot you, they may attempt to circle around you to use the wind to their advantage. Don’t panic when this happens, and if you need to change shooting positions, do it slowly when the critter is in a low spot or behind a tree.

    Our best calling has been when we have two or more hunters and whenever possible facing opposite directions so we’ve both avenues of approach covered in case a coyote would come in behind us.

  Another mistake that some callers make, including our group is to hunt with just  scoped rifles, as on occasion, a coyote will pop up in front of you, too close to get a decent shot using a scope.  Now when we call, one of us always brings along a shotgun loaded with heavy loads.

  We use a combination of calls, relying heavily on our ICOtec electronic callers, but all hunters with us will also have mouth calls just in case we’re caught by surprise.

  The wounded rabbit calls, the cottontail and jackrabbit calls have been around a long time. In some areas, have been over used, making predators fooled by them once, much more cautious when coming into these calls. [Read more…]

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Snows on the ground They are on the Move Gary Howey

This winter, the countryside is covered in the white stuff, snow, which means it is prime time to get out and “take a shot” at calling predators.

No longer can predators, fox and coyotes go almost anywhere to pick up an easy meal as the pastures fence lines and shelterbelts are now covered or buried in snow.

Winter makes it hard for predators to find the critters they eat to build up their energy level and to stay warm during those cold winter nights.

The young not so bright critters, the weak and the old are long since gone, while others have gone into hibernation, so predators in the winter have to work hard and at times travel great distances to find a meal.

Predators like all of Mother Nature’s critters are opportunists, taking the easiest route and taking every opportunity for an easy meal.

When predators hear a distress call or the sound of another animal in trouble, whether it is a bird or fur bearer, they are, going to high tail it to the sound hoping to find whatever is making the noise easy pickings.

Calling Predators isn’t a walk in the park, as predators have keen senses including their sight and sense of smell, which can pick you out before you even get set up to call. Do not get me wrong, you do not need to be a Rhodes Scholar to call predators; you just need to use common sense.

One of those things needed to be successful, is to get into the area you want to call without being seen as the eyes of a predator can spot movement at great distances, so stealth, keeping the noise down and blending in with the terrain you will cross are important.

This is where some sort of camouflage, concealment enters into play. When you are calling in snow covered ground, some sort of snow camo can make or break you. My partners our cameraman and I all don complete camo, and at times, wearing snow ghille suits. Everything we bring into the field where we will set up and call, including our rifles, shotguns, clothing, stocking caps, and facemasks match the terrain.

In northeast Nebraska, where we do much of our calling, there is an over abundance of Cedar trees we can back into when we call.

This means, we will be setting on the ground in the snow while our backs are against the Cedars and when we hunt this way why we wear dark clothing above the waist and snow camo below!

You do not need expensive camo to call predators during the winter as something as simple as an old white sheet can do the job. If you are hunting in open ground, you can cut a slot in the sheet, pull it over your head and wear it like a Mexican serape or poncho. [Read more…]

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SHOT Show-2015 What’s New for the Outdoorsmen Part 1 By Gary Howey

We just returned from spending three days at the Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Technology (SHOT) Show in Las Vegas held at the Sands Convention Center. This is a huge event bringing together manufacturers, hunters, shooters, press, military, police, mass merchandisers, gun shop owners, sporting goods store owners and celebrities, those of us that live and breathe the shooting sports. At the show, thousands of exhibitors display some of the latest’s and greatest products coming to market in 2015.

If you are looking for anything to do with shooting, this is where all the new products are introduced.

In our next two columns, we will highlight some of those products that should make your next trip to the field and range much more enjoyable and successful.

Lucky Duck Flapper Canada Goose Decoy with Remote

Over the years, our Team has hunted over hundreds of decoy spreads all over the U.S. These spreads have drawn brought ducks and geese in, with those with decoy movement involved bringing the waterfowl in quicker, getting them to commit, bringing them in, wings set, and feet down, right out in front of our hunters.

This last season one of the hunters we hunt with brought the Lucky Flapper Canada Goose Decoy with a Remote, which increased the number of geese coming to our decoys tremendously.

It is a life size Canada Goose Decoy with a Flocked Head, featuring durable flapping magnetic EVA wings, which makes for easy setup.

The unit comes with a remote control, twelve-volt battery, charger and metal tripod base. It runs continuous or intermittent-3 seconds on, and then 10 seconds off with variable speeds.

The head of the decoy is thirty-six inches off the ground with a wingspan of forty-three inches. The remote will work out to 100 yard from the decoy, running up to 9 hours continuous on one charge.

More information on this and other Lucky Duck decoys available at www.luckyduck.com

Winchester Deer Season XP Ammunition

Deer hunting is a popular sport in North America with over 10 million hunters who wait for the deer season in hopes of tagging one of the estimated 26 million deer found in the United States.

There is not a lot of ammunition made specifically for deer hunting, the majority of the deer hunters out there have been using ammunition built for a variety of animals, with much of the available ammo, overbuilt for hunting a thin-skinned animal such as the deer. Those bullets have did a good job over the years, what Winchester was looking for was a bullet made specifically for deer hunters. [Read more…]

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When the Snow flies It is Predator Calling Time Gary Howey

When the snow flies, predator hunters know this is the ideal time to start calling predators.  It is a wonder that after my first predator calling trip that I ever did it again. One of those trips into the field, which will make you wonder what you were doing out there.

A friend of mine from Omaha who works as a manufacturer’s representative for a call company called one afternoon and asked if I would like to try howling for coyotes.

Back then, I was game for almost everything, so I told him why not. I figured we had a couple of hours of daylight left and with the new snow on the ground; we could easily spot the coyotes.

The sun had just set when he pulled into our driveway and I figured our hunting opportunity had disappeared along with the sun.
Well, I was mistaken as he planned on hunting after dark, with the two of us setting up back to back, howling at the coyotes, using the light of the full moon to spot them as they came in.

[Read more…]