"Put the Power of Television advertising to work for you"

post

Establishing Spring Food Plots

With spring in full swing and the woods coming to life after a long winter hiatus, the opportunities for improving habitat for wildlife are numerous. If you live in the south, the soil temperature is ripe for planting, and the Midwest and north are not far behind. If you have had problems in the past establishing spring and summer plots for your deer because of over browsing and high deer numbers, trying to time your planting to coincide with spring green up can be a big advantage. Whitetails love the fresh growth that the woods and thickets explode with during that first few weeks of green up. There is no other time of year when there is such an overwhelming amount of fresh browse

from such a variety of plants. This explosion of vast amounts of new food throughout the woods can take a lot of pressure off of your plots and give them a chance to get some established growth that is more tolerant of browse pressure. It can be hard to realize that you can plant warm season plots like BioLogic’s LabLab or BioMass All Legume this early in the year, but once the threat of frost is gone and soil temperatures warm up to the upper 50’s, it is game on. Also remember to try BioLogic’s Plot Protector kit, this is what I rely on to make sure our plots get established and feed our deer for the entire summer.

 

 

post

Controlling Weeds with 6 Easy Steps

A weed free food plot tucked into the woods somewhere is a beautiful sight. So how do you keep those pesky weeds out of your favorite spot? BioLogic’s new Weed Reaper Grass Control is designed to knock out all those unwanted annual and perennial grasses that are so common in food plots. Weeds rob your plot of essential nutrients, water, and root space. Given time and opportunity, weeds will quickly mature, produce seed, and overtake a well intended food plot. Weed Reaper herbicide is one of the greatest tools a GameKeeper can utilize to keep weeds under control and get the most out of your plantings. This new herbicide is designed to spray over clover, chicory, alfalfa, beans, peas, lablab and any other broadleaf or legume plot. Use these tips when spraying Weed Reaper for best results.

1)  Understand What you’re Using

Read The Label-the information on the herbicide labels contain great info and will identify what weeds they control and what crops it is designed to protect.

2)  Don’t Wait On the Weeds

Spray when grasses are young and thriving. If you wait to spray when they are tall and mature, the results will often be less than desirable. If weeds are already tall and maturing, mow first and return 7-10 days later to spray the new re-growth. [Read more…]

post

3 Tips To Prepare For Spring And Summer

By this time of the year, most everyone’s hunting season is over or starting to wind down and not many guys are thinking about growing plots or feeding their deer. With some cold and nasty weather still possible for the next few weeks, it’s a great time to sit down and start planning for the upcoming growing season. There may be some things you thought of while sitting in your deer stand this fall that you would like to accomplish on the property you manage.

1)  Soil Preparation

One of the first things I like to do in February and March is pull soil samples on my plots and get them sent in to see if I need to add any lime and see what fertilizer will be needed for my warm season annuals that will be planted in late April/early May. If you had soil samples taken this fall you will already have an idea of where your plots are in needing lime or nutrients. Have an up to date sample of the areas you plant to plant this spring and if the ph is low, have lime spread in the late winter/early spring. This will give the ag lime time to start working on the soil for your spring/summer plots and also those fields that are left fallow through the summer and are typically only planted in the fall. Depending on the size of the screen that the lime is run through at the quarry, the granular consistency of ag lime can take several months to break down and begin to neutralize the acidity in your soil.

2)  Manage Your Perennial Food Plots

Many of us spend a good deal of time throughout the spring/summer managing and manicuring our perennial clover and chicory plots. If you planted perennials this past fall be sure and take the time to mow, fertilize, and spray them through the warm season so they will stay weed free and thriving. With good maintenance and favorable weather, you can get several years of production from a good perennial. Weed competition is the number one problem in managing perennial food plots. The first month after spring green up is when you will see the flush of weeds including grasses and broadleaves start to invade your fields. Catching these weeds early in the growth cycle and spraying them while they are young and actively growing will yield much better results than waiting to spray the weeds when they are more mature. In the south you may lose your clover to the hot weather and dry conditions in July and August, but if these fields are maintained properly through the spring and early summer, they will jump back out from dormancy in late summer/early fall much more quickly and back to that lush field it was in the spring. BioLogic will have two new herbicides called Weed Reaper available this spring for controlling both grasses and broadleaf weeds in legumes like clover.

3)  Equipment Maintenance

Another great time saver for this time of year is equipment maintenance. Your spray rigs, bush-hogs, tractors and trailers have been sitting most of the fall and winter and it’s a great idea to go ahead and do some routine maintenance. Getting your bush-hog blades sharpened and spray rigs calibrated and working properly can be a big time saver when done ahead of time instead of fighting leaking hoses, wore out bearings, and wore out pumps the day you need to be spraying or mowing. In February I like to get all the fluids changed out on my tractor and make sure everything is operating properly. You can also hook up your spray rig to check clamps, hoses, and valves for any possible cracks or leaks. Run clean water through the lines and make sure all nozzles and filters are clean and flowing properly. Late winter is also a good opportunity to go ahead and reserve rented equipment such as lime/fertilizer buggies, spray rigs, etc so you have it available on the dates you need.  

   

post

5 TIPS FOR BETTER SOIL PREP

The late summer/early fall planting season is quickly approaching, for guys that live in the far North it’s here. We are often asked what are some tips for good seed bed prep. I believe one of the biggest reasons for poor seed bed prep is trying to work soil with too much green or overgrown vegetation. This problem is magnified when coupled with inadequate equipment.

It is really tough to prepare a good seed bed when you are trying to disc or till under massive amounts of green vegetation. Your disc or tiller simply can’t work as it is supposed to with the tonnage of grass and weeds in the way. A properly timed non selective herbicide application can kill the unwanted weeds and dry them down where your equipment can function much more efficiently saving you a lot of tractor/atv time and fuel.M.O.-Game Keepers (1)

Many who are unfamiliar with herbicides are afraid of spraying a non selective herbicide like round-up (glyphosate) in fear that it may affect their planting. Glyphosate is a contact only herbicide and has no soil or residual activity, in other words if it doesn’t touch the green tissue of a living plant it is non effective. This allows you to spray very close to your planting time to help your crop get a jump start on any weeds. The ideal timing for mowing and spraying can take 2-4 weeks before planting to really get good results, so the time to act is now.

Follow these tips for good pre–planting herbicide applications. [Read more…]

post

Now’s is the Time to Prepare for Deer Season! Gary Howey

  One of the major mistakes that deer hunters make is to put off their preparation for deer season until just prior to the opener.

  Deer spend most of their life within a small area and are used to what they see, day in and day out.

  The woods deer live in could be compared to our homes and since we’re in it every day, if something is moved or missing; we’re going to notice it.

  It’s the same way in the woods, if there’s a drastic change in their environment, they’re going to notice it and stay clear until they’re certain that it’s not something that’s going to harm them.

  Deer and other wildlife have to be cautious, as every large predator in the woods are out to make them into their next meal, so if something changes and they aren’t used to it, they’ll become weary and change their patterns.

  This is why it’s a good idea to get ready for this falls deer season as early as possible because, any changes you make now gives the deer time to adjust to them.

  This isn’t much of a problem if you hunt out of the same stands year in and year out because those dark objects in the trees (deer stands) have always been there.

  However, because deer patterns change, chances are you’re going to have to do some modification no matter how long your stand has been there.

  There are several reasons why deer patterns will change, one of these is if the adjacent landowners cropping system changes from corn to bean or from alfalfa to some other crop.

  Changes such as these may cause the deer to not use or quit using the same trails that run into these fields; those, that in past years have ran right past your stand.

  Another might be that emerging vegetation and new trees down the line from your stand now force the deer to swing wide, farther away from the stand, you hunt out of making it a longer shot or out in an area where you have no shot. [Read more…]

post

6 Tips for Drought Proofing Food Plots

WEST POINT, MS – This time of year means that parts of the whitetails’ range are or could soon be under a drought. Following these six steps for drought proofing food plots could mean the difference between having some food for deer or a complete withered failure.

Select the right location. You can’t just select any open spot and expect success. As an example, if you choose a spot that has beach sand for soil, you shouldn’t expect much. First and foremost, the site needs to be able to sustain your selected crop.

Time your planting properly. While we definitely have predetermined windows for when specific crops should be planted, one should be adaptable and open to planting when there is ample moisture to germinate the seed and get the new seedling off to a good start. Obviously, if you’re an absentee landowner, you may have a prearranged date on which you have to plant. But if you have the flexibility, you should wait until just before a rain event to ensure adequate soil moisture will be present.

Soil preparation may be the most important detail. These ideas will help to make more moisture available to your plant’s roots:

If soil moisture is limited or dry times are expected, it’s best to reduce the amount of times you turn the soil. Every time you work the soil valuable moisture is lost.  Frequent disking dries out the soil and leaves less moisture available for seed germination.
A tiller requires fewer passes to achieve the same results as a disk. It can create a suitable seedbed with a single pass, where a disk would require numerous passes to achieve the same results.
If you have a hard pan, removing the hard pan by sub-soiling periodically allows the plant’s roots to penetrate deeper so they’re able to access moisture that would otherwise be unavailable if a hard-pan is present. During dry conditions the presence of a hard pan causes the topsoil to dry out more quickly. Deeper roots result in increased drought tolerance. 
Eliminate weed competition. Unwanted competition will steal valuable moisture from your crop. Controlling competition with the correct herbicide is vital if you wish success during dry spells. Once your crop becomes established it will often shade out the competition, which also helps to conserve topsoil moisture. [Read more…]

post

How Deep Should My Food Plot Seed be Planted?

How Deep Should My Food Plot Seed be Planted?

M.O.-Game Keepers (1)

One of the most common mistakes when planting food plots is improper soil coverage, whether it be too deep or to shallow. The question “how deep should I plant the seed?” is a question with several variables. Very small seeds such as rape, clover, chicory, turnips, or alfalfa need very little soil covering for good germination. Often times these small seeds get disced in or planted in a field with a fluffy seed bed with a lot of airspace and the result is very poor germination. These tiny seeds just don’t contain the energy to push up through 2 inches of dirt. [Read more…]

post

5 “MUST-HAVES” IF YOU WANT TO SEE MORE WILD TURKEYS

M.O.-Game Keepers (1)Most wildlife species require the “F+W+C+S Formula” (Food, Water, Cover, and Sanctuary) functioning in an area for them to take up residence. For wild turkeys it’s a little more involved than that. Turkeys need each element listed, but they are a bit more persnickety, everything needs to be just right for turkeys to take up residence in your hunting area. There are also a couple things you MUST NOT have for turkeys to be found consistently in the vicinity. Let’s take a look at what our feathered friends need and don’t need.

1.FOOD
Wild turkeys need a wide array of food types at different times of the year. These foods would also vary region to region and thus subspecies to subspecies. An eastern gobbler in Mississippi is going to have a different diet than a Merriam’s in South Dakota. While some would think that planting a corn field would take care of a majority of their food needs, they aren’t even close.
Crops like clover, corn, rye, fescue, oats, millet, sorghum and chufa are great places to begin, but turkeys will also require “bugging habitat” and native foods like mast (acorns, beechnuts, hickory nuts and soft mast like wild cherry, grapes and berries), buds from deciduous trees and shrubs, along with other natural foods.
While most times you shouldn’t need to supply special bugging habitat…I would. Most of the time, mowed open areas or your whitetail food plots create excellent bugging habitat, but insects can make up over 80% of a poult’s diet! My suggestion would be to provide some wildflowers and an assortment of other pollinators. Besides attracting invertebrates, many of these species will also produce seeds relished by turkeys and other birds.

2.WATER
Duh, got to have it! Let’s add “reliable” to that. They must have a consistent, reliable water source. The dew in the bottom of a boot print or a creek that dies up during a drought doesn’t cut it for turkeys. In fact, they prefer to roost near water. Just like you, they need it every day.
3.COVER
Here’s where their habitat requirements become a bit more sophisticated than that of whitetails’. Turkeys require roost trees, nesting habitat, open areas and escape cover. Most often they will reside in timbered areas during the winter and utilize food plots, agricultural fields, meadows and other clearings during the summer – where they can find food, but also escape quickly to cover.
Mature timber of some kind is required for roosting. Tree height and structure is more important than species; however, oaks, pine, maple and cottonwood are some of their favorites.
Warm-season grasses, sometimes called “bunch grasses,” grow in thick clusters instead of spreading out to form a layer of sod. This type of growth allows for space between the bunches, so your flock has nesting, foraging and escape cover all in one.

[Read more…]

post

6 Ways Wildflowers Play a Vital Role in Wildlife Management

1.They Attract Insects
Wildflowers are the host plant for all sorts of insects, therefore your wildflower plots will be loaded down with Lepidopterans (moths and butterflies), Orthopterans (grasshoppers and crickets), Hymenopterans (bees, wasps, and ants), and others. Benefits resulting from having more insects include better pollination and fruit/seed-set of crops and trees, beneficial insects to combats unwanted pests, insects to feed your wildlife, and…honey!!!M.O.-Game Keepers (1)

2.They’ll grow on poor sites you’d normally leave idle
Many of the more common and popular wildflower species will survive and thrive on areas that just don’t seem worth the effort to establish a traditional food plot. Log loading decks are often left scalped of their top soil layer and compacted. These setbacks are no big deal for wildflowers. In fact, the little wildflower sprouts won’t have near the weed and grass competition compared to being planted in better soils, so they’ll have a much greater chance of survival and persistence.

3.Soil Improvement
By establishing wildflowers on previously underutilized, poorish sites, your soil will likely improve enough in time to become usable for lush food plots. Wildflowers often have aggressive root systems that penetrate deep to mine moisture and nutrients. As a result, hard soil layers will become loosened and aerated, levels of organic matter and top soil will increase, and soil microflora will flourish. [Read more…]

post

WEED-FREE FOOD PLOTS

A weed free food plot tucked into the woods somewhere is a beautiful sight. So how do you keep those pesky weeds out of your favorite spot? BioLogic’s new M.O.-Game Keepers (1)WEED REAPER GRASS CONTROL is designed to knock out all those unwanted annual and perennial grasses that are so common in food plots. Weeds rob your plot of essential nutrients, water, and root space. Given time and opportunity, weeds will quickly mature, produce seed, and overtake a well intended food plot. Weed Reaper herbicide is one of the greatest tools a GameKeeper can utilize to keep weeds under control and get the most out of your plantings. This new herbicide is designed to spray over clover, chicory, alfalfa, beans, peas, lablab and any other broadleaf or legume plot. Use these tips when spraying Weed Reaper for best results.

1. Read The Label – The information on the herbicide labels contain great info and will identify what weeds they control and what crops it is designed to protect.

2. Spray when grasses are young and thriving – If you wait to spray when they are tall and mature, the results will often be less than desirable. If weeds are already tall and maturing, mow first and return 7-10 days later to spray the new re-growth.

3. Spray in good conditions – Cloudy and still days are best. Windy and rainy days do not make for good conditions to spray in. [Read more…]