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Poachers Stealing from us all By Gary Howey

  Those that take game illegally, poachers are robbing us, the hunters as well as our state of valuable resources and something needs to be done to stop this.

  It’s not just a problem for one state; it’s one affecting all the states and one that needs to be addressed.

  Some of the animals poached were left lay to rot, while others had their head and rack cut off that were either mounted and displayed as a legal mount in the poachers home or sold to someone else who had it mounted and displayed.

  It’s not just big game animals that are poached as fish are also affected by poaching as they over bag, taking more than their limit, which depletes the fish population, and if continued over an extended period may deplete the ponds fish population. If a poacher takes a trophy fish illegally, it takes away legal anglers the opportunity of catching that trophy fish.

  Many times, those that have broken the law, poached big game or came home with five to ten time their limit of fish seem to get away with it, receiving a small fine, probation and little else.

  Take for instance when poachers killed and left lay 25 antelope in western Nebraska the two men should have lost their right to hunt, paid huge fines and then went to jail. This would have been a deterrent to them and others who think nothing of breaking our game laws and robbing law-abiding hunters the opportunity to take these animals.

  These poachers received fines of $950.00 and sentenced to 18 months probation and each man ordered to pay $530.00 in court costs and $6,000.00 in liquidated damages.

  The liquidated damages, what the state deems the animals poached were worth, if divided among the fifteen animals is only $240.00 for each animal.   [Read more…]

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True Conservationists “Hunters” By Gary Howey

 For years, we’ve all heard anti-hunters yell and scream about animals having rights and that hunters don’t care about wildlife.

  I’m sure there are some of you reading this, may think what these anti-hunting groups are saying could be factual.

  When in fact, it was hunters supported the 1937 Pitman Robertson Act, which imposed a 10% excise tax on their purchases of guns, ammunition and outdoor equipment. Through this excise tax, hunters have contributed over $4-billion dollars used to purchase millions of acres of public land that benefits all species of wildlife.

   Another fact you may not heard is that hunters since 1923 asked for and have paid for their state’s hunting licenses.

  This amounts to over $6.5-billion dollars received from these licensing fees, that’s paid for by hunters, the dollars raised from these fees are a major portion of the Nebraska’s and South Dakota’s Game & Parks and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources budgets.

  Since 1934, our waterfowl hunters purchased their Federal Duck Stamps, bringing in close to 800-million dollars, with a percentage of these dollars going directly towards the purchase or lease wetlands and wildlife habitat.

  Add to this the dollars donated by hunters to wildlife groups such as Ducks Unlimited, Pheasants Forever, Whitetails Unlimited, National Wild Turkey Federation, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and others, they contribute an additional $300-million each year to wildlife conservation activities. 

  Other items that enter into these figures according to the National Shooting Sports Foundation, is that hunting contributes over $30-billion to the economy every year and supports over 1-million jobs

 There are many ways hunters not only support wildlife but also contribute to other worthwhile programs, including numerous fundraisers such as celebrity hunts and benefit trap shoots. These hunters and celebrities at these events help to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. These events do not just support hunting related projects, but projects such as Habitat for Humanity and other events, proving hunters not only care about the outdoors and wildlife; they also care about their fellow man. [Read more…]

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My Journey into Big Game Hunting By Gary Howey

Hunting Big Game is a great sport, especially when you’re a young kid that grew up in northeastern South Dakota.

  My journey into the sport of Big Game hunting started out rather innocently!  I grew up in Watertown, South Dakota and was always looking for another outdoor adventure, joining Cub and Boy Scouts and reading their publication from front to back as it had stories and information on camping and other outdoor activities.  Then I looked for and read every adventure book available, and especially liked those written by Jack London and similar writers.

  It was my way of getting away, going to places, I thought I would never have the opportunity to go to, and these books opened my eyes to a much larger world than I lived in.

  My idea of hunting when I was a kid growing up in Watertown was being out with my BB gun after stripped gophers in a pasture, stalking squirrels in the woods and rabbits along the Sioux River.

  I loved it, even though many times, I’d come home without firing a shot, yet it was still a great experience and what got me into hunting.  If I hadn’t done it, I may have never gotten into any other type of hunting.

  As I got older, ten or eleven, Watertown Recreation had archery classes at the auditorium, which I took and later became a member of the archery club.

  The archery equipment was furnished by Recreation and we had what we thought was Hi-Tech equipment, our thirty- pound fiberglass recurve bows that shot the best cedar arrows, a dollar could buy!

  We competed in an archery tournament in Minnesota and when we came to the line and looked at all the contestants with laminated wood bows with stabilizers and such; we darn near turned around and went home.

  We were shooting field targets that looked like they were set up a football field away and because our group had only shot short distances, inside the Watertown auditorium, we didn’t have a clue.

  Just as we were about to start the competition, it started to drizzle and after a couple of rounds, the glue holding the fletching on our cedar shafts let go and what little accuracy we had quickly went out the window.

  It’s a wonder I ever picked up a bow again, but I’m glad I did as hunting with a bow has allowed me to expand my hunting experience.

  What exactly is Big Game?  To some, Big Game may not be deer, but to me, someone who, as a youngster only hunted with a BB gun, having the opportunity to go after deer, antelope, bear and elk was Big Game hunting to me.   [Read more…]

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Team Outdoorsmen Adventures Member Marlyn Wiebelhaus By Gary Howey

Team Outdoorsmen Adventures member and guide Marlyn Wiebelhaus, Wynot, NE. spends hundreds of hour s in the outdoors with his bow in pursuit of deer, turkey, antelope and elk.

When not in the field with his bow, he out bow fishing for rough fish including the high-flying silver, grass carp, bighead carp, gar and paddlefish.

He has taken Pope and Young deer and is the holder of numerous bowfishing records in Nebraska and South Dakota.Pic-Marlyin's Gar

Recently he connected with a huge 52 inch, 19 pound long nose gar while bowfishing on the Missouri River.

If you are interested in bow hunting for deer or turkey, bowfishing on the Missouri in northeast Nebraska and bowfishing on the Jim River in southeastern South Dakota, you can call Marlyn at Wiebelhaus guide Service at www.wiebelhausguiding.com or contact him at 402-357-2389 [Read more…]